Prostate Cancer Screening for Early Detection and Treatment

In 2003, there were approximately 220,900 diagnosed cases and 28,900 recorded deaths from prostate cancer in the United States. These statistics shows that prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death. The public health importance of cancer prevention and treatment will rise as they increasingly contribute to the overall cancer burden. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of male cancer-related death in the United States. The etiology of the prostate cancer is still unknown despite the substantial studies on morbidity and mortality. Despite the current belief that the prevalence of latent microscopic prostate tumors in most populations is similar, several epidemiologic observation shows very large differences in incidence rates among racial/ethnic groups. The 2001 study of Hsing & Devesa suggested that dietary fats, obesity, and sexual factors may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk in certain population. Continued monitoring of prostate cancer incidence and trends will encourage prostate cancer screening for early detection and treatment.

Reference

Bradley, L. A., Palomaki, G., Gutman, S., Samson, D. J., & Aronson, N. (2013). PCA3 Testing for the Diagnosis and Management of Prostate Cancer.

Hsing, A. W., & Devesa, S. S. (2001). Trends and patterns of prostate cancer: what do they suggest? Epidemiologic reviews23(1), 3-13.

Labilles, U. (2013). “Bone Metastases in Prostate Cancer” A Cross-Sectional Study. (Unpublished, PUBH-8155-3. Research in Public Health. 2013 Fall Qtr. WK11Assgn) Walden University, Minneapolis.

Li, J., Djenaba, J. A., Soman, A., Rim, S. H., & Master, V. A. (2012). Recent Trends in Prostate Cancer Incidence by Age, Cancer Stage, and Grade, the United States, 2001–2007. Prostate cancer2012.

O.N.E.—One Nation’s Echo | One

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